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Needle Free Insulin

This page is based on information provided by the manufacturers of the MHI-500 insulin jet system, Medical House plc.

  What is the MHI-500?

  Who is it suitable for?

  Is there any difference in the onset of action?

  Are the injections pain free?

  What are the suitable sites for injection?

  Does this method cause any blistering or skin problems?

  What type of insulin is suitable for use with this device?

  Is it available on the NHS?

  How many units of insulin can be injected at a time?

  How long can I use the MHI-500?

  Is it suitable for partially sighted people?

  The MHI-500 starter Kit consists of...

  Where can I get more information?

What is the MHI-500?

This is a spring loaded device for injecting insulin without the use of a needle. This device forces a fine jet of insulin at high speed which allows it to penetrate through the skin

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Who is it suitable for?

It provides an alternative method of insulin injection for those who are uncomfortable with the use of needles

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Is there any difference in the onset of action ?

No. Once injected the insulin works in  the same way.

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Are the injections pain free?

No. Needle-free does not necessarily mean pain-free, though some may find it less painful than using needles. 

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What are the suitable sites for injection?

There are three recommended sites. The abdominal wall, buttocks and upper thighs.

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Does this method cause any blistering or skin problems?

If you bruise easliy or are on anticoagulant medication, you should not use this device.

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What type of insulin is suitable for use with this device?

Any type is OK provided it is available in 10 ml vials. You should not have to change the type of insulin that you normally use. An adaptor for the 3ml pen cartridges is being developed. This will enable insulins in this packaging to be loaded into the MHI-500.

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Is it available on the NHS?

The mhi-500 has recently been approved by the Prescription Pricing Authority and is now available on prescription, together with its consumables, for people in England and Wales. If you are interested in using this device you should talk to your doctor about whether or not the mhi-500 is suitable for you. The device costs 120 for people buying on a private basis. The replacement nozzles, pistons and vial adaptor cost approximately 1.00-1.50 every week.

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How many units of insulin can be injected at a time?

The maximum you can deliver at one time is 50 units.

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How long can I use the MHI-500?

The device has a 12 month warranty. The munufacturers recommend that you replace the device after this period has expired.

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Is it suitable for partially sighted people?

The manufacturer does not recommend anyone who is severely visually-impaired or registered blind to self-administer the mhi-500. A competent carer could help assist the totally blind person to use the MHI-500.

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The MHI-500 starter Kit consists of:

1 x Needle-free Insulin Delivery System, 1 x Practice nozzle system, 2 x Size 6 Sterile Nozzles, 2 x Size 7 Sterile Nozzles, 2 x Disposable 10ml Vial Adaptors, 1 x Set of Pressure Rings, 1 x Instruction Manual, 1 x Carry Case.

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Where can I get more information?

Medical House website: http://www.insulinjet.com

The Medical House PLC
Unit 8 Riverside Court
Don Road
Sheffield S9 2QJ
Helpline 0800 917 7328

 

8th May 2003

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West Suffolk Hospitals NHS Trust, Hardwick Lane, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk IP33 2QZ, tel:01284 713000